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Latest News

Dr Greg Schmid has arrived!

We are excited to welcome Dr Greg Schmid to the team at Columbia Equine! Check out his bio on our Staff page and stay tuned to our Facebook page for an invite to the meet & greet we are planning for him at the clinic.

Another positive case of EIA in Portland...

2/9/16

POSITIVE EIA CASE PORTLAND, OR- As of today, there has been one horse that has been tentatively labeled as positive for Equine Infectious Anemia, (EIA) at Portland Meadows race track. According to Oregon state veterinarian, Dr Brad LeaMaster, the positive horse was detected on routine testing. All horses leaving Portland Meadows are required to have a recent negative Coggins test and must provide a declaration of movements, stating where the horse will be moved to and the current owners information. EIA is a blood borne disease, spread primarily by reuse of hypodermic needles and biting insects. Symptoms of the disease include fever, anemia, jaundice, edema and weight loss. For now, we are recommending following the same bio-security measures that we suggest any time you travel with your horse- don't share water or feed buckets with horses you don't know, don't allow your horses to touch noses with unknown horses, and think twice before allowing unknown people to pet your horse, especially if they have been touching other horses. To prevent the spread of EIA, we recommend all horses have a Coggins test performed (this is an EIA blood test), only disposable needles and syringes are used and that barn owners implement insect control on their properties. Feel free to direct any questions towards our office: (503) 663-1515

UPDATE: EHV-1 in Oregon

More horses found with Equine Herpes Virus, including most serious form

5/5/2015

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Three more cases have been found in Oregon of horses infected with Equine Herpes Virus 1, or EHV-1, and one animal has the most serious “neurotropic” form of the virus that is far more likely to cause serious, sometimes permanent neurological damage.

An initial case of EHV-1 reported last week, and also being treated in isolation at OSU, only had the more common wild strain of the virus. That horse did show neurologic symptoms, although animals with that strain of EHV-1 more often have a disease that causes respiratory infection or abortion in pregnant mares.

Two more cases have been identified of horses with the wild strain, that are not showing signs of neurologic disease, and they are being treated at their home stables in Polk County. Both forms of EHV-1 are highly contagious to horses, but not transmissible to people.

However, a fourth case has been confirmed with the neurotropic form of EHV-1, veterinary experts say, which increases the seriousness of the current outbreak, and makes it increasingly important that horse owners in Oregon practice strong biosecurity management of their animals.

“About 80 percent of the horses who develop neurologic problems from EHV-1 have the neurotropic form of the virus,” said John Schlipf, a large animal internal medicine specialist with the OSU College of Veterinary Medicine. “It’s a significantly more serious concern. The disease can be fatal, or it can cause lasting neurologic damage that leaves the animal with a permanently reduced level of function.”

The most recent case was brought to OSU’s Lois Bates Acheson Veterinary Teaching Hospital from the Salem area. Both cases are being treated in isolation, and all OSU veterinary teaching hospital facilities are open for business as usual.

The initial case last week was in a horse housed in Marion County that had recently attended events at the Linn County Fairgrounds in Albany on April 16-19. Prior to the development of clinical signs in the initial case and institution of the quarantine, horses housed with the initial case had attended an event at the Oregon Horse Center in Eugene on April 25-26. The newest case was not at the Linn County event, Schlipf said, but had been in contact with other horses that attended.

Since there’s a 10-14 day incubation period for this virus, Schlipf said, it is possible that more horses will be found to be infected. Owners of horses that may be at risk are encouraged to monitor their animals closely for a fever and any signs of respiratory or neurologic disease. More information about the virus and biosecurity recommendations is available online at http://bit.ly/1GNttiS

Early clinical signs of the neurologic form of EHV-1 often begin with the hind limbs and include:

Uncoordinated, stumbling movements;

An unusual gait;

A weak tail tone;

Difficulty urinating, and dribbling of urine;

Nasal discharge, frequently accompanied by a fever.

The Oregon Department of Agriculture recommends that horses that attended the Albany or Eugene events avoid contact with other horses and have their temperatures monitored twice daily. Temperatures over 101.5 degrees may indicate illness.

Horses with these signs should be isolated from other animals, and owners should contact their veterinarians immediately. EHV-1 can also affect alpacas and llamas, Schlipf said.

“We must reiterate the need for horse owners to practice biosecurity,” Schlipf said. “People handling horses should wash their hands and clothing to reduce spread of a virus. Animals should not share tack, and horses that have traveled or mingled with other animals should be segregated.

“All of these steps can help, and are especially important right now. It may be a while yet before we are out of the woods with this outbreak.”

EHV-1 Diagnosed in Horse from Marion County

Emergency Medicine

Emergencies are always stressful so it is important to know what an emergency is and when to call your veterinarian. Read more »

We Offer Equine Acupuncture!

Our very own Dr. Rioux shares some insight into equine acupuncture and how it may benefit your horse. Read more »

Testimonials

“Competent and helpful.”

“Professional and compassionate.”

“I have been using CEH for years, and I have 100% faith in them.”

“I always have a great experience with them.”

“I recommend them for all your horses medical needs.”

“We always have a good visit when we take our horses to Columbia Equine!”

“Columbia Equine has a wonderful staff of professionals & state of the art equipment.”

“They're focused on the well being of the animals more than anything else. They educate the customer and are helpful in many aspects, I recommend them all the time!”

– Marlene

“Blessed am I to have this great vet team behind me and my pony thank you Columbia Equine Hospital! You rock!”

– Lauren

“Thank you for the great addition to your already top notch staff at Columbia Equine. We love you guys!”

“Amazing vets and beautiful facility. I've had my horses under their care before and they do an awesome job! I would recommend any of my fellow horse friends to take their horses there.”

“I can not begin thank Dr. Hanson and staff for the amazing care they gave my horse...”

“My initial conversation was with Alexis, me asking a lot of questions, she providing a lot of professional answers and setting up an appointment for a farm visit later that day, to Dr. Rioux-Forker showing up on time, listening to the problems we are having with our OTTB, Leon, asking thoughtful questions, and suggesting helpful solutions, we were very happy with every interaction we had with the staff at Columbia Equine Hospital. Very helpful. Very professional. Very experienced. And reasonably priced. Thank you!”

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